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Just the right temperature

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I don’t want to preach to you about how you should cook. I just want to be able to help you find your own hidden cooking talents by the benefit of knowledge I have gained being a chef.
This is one such gem temperature of meat and how to get perfect cooking results by using a temp probe. I can not stress this enough buy a temp probe and your cooked meat will improved a million fold. Cooking has an element of science involved and cooking meat to the right temperature and resting it can make your meaty treats truly tasty. Here is the link to CDN probe I own, it is fantastic!!

http://www.amazon.co.uk/CDN-Digital-Pro-Accurate-Cooking-Thermometer/dp/B000GIZ5HY/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1319285848&sr=8-9

These are temperatures to guide you in cooking red meat. excluding poultry which is cooked to 70-4 °C Be careful, under cooked chicken can give you an unpleasant stomach upset.

Extra-rare or Blue (bleu) very red and cold 46–49 °C
Rare (saignant) cold red center; soft 52–55 °C
Medium rare (à point) warm red center; firmer 55–60 °C
Medium (cuit) pink and firm 60–65 °C
Medium well (bien cuit) small amount of pink in center 65–69 °C
Well done gray-brown throughout; firm 71-100 °C
Overcook blacken throughout; crispy >100 °C

A member of the rose family, mr strawberry

The strawberry is a member of the rose family and is not actually a fruit. Have you also noticed the strawberry is the only natural item (i know fruit sounds shit loads better) we eat with seeds on the outside rather than the inside. They are also a very healthy fruit, being rich in vitamin C and a good source of folic acid as well as being high in fibre. The best fruit to eat for breakfast and a superfood.

Origin of the Strawberries we eat today is that they are an American fruit, because north American farmers created a hybrid between a variety commonly eaten by north American Indians and a south American variety, giving us our sweeter strawberry varieties we eat today.

Strawberries were cultivated by the Romans as early as 200 BC and in mediaeval times strawberries were regarded as an aphrodisiac and a soup made of strawberries, borage and soured cream was traditionally served to newly-weds at their wedding breakfast. Sounds interesting I will give this a try and get back too you. I hopefully have some borage sprouting soon in the garden.

There are a multitude of recipes out there for strawberries, I just like them marinated in a couple of teaspoons of balsamic vinegar and served with a dollop of creme fraiche, how do you eat yours?

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Seasonal favourite

It is no wonder that the cantaloupe or Charentais in France with its refreshingly rich flavor and aroma and minimal number of calories is the most popular variety of melon in France. Although they have become increasingly available throughout the year, their season runs from June through August when they are at their best. Great with Parma ham or marinated in Malibu or with pickled ginger.

The cantaloupe derives its name from the ltalian papal village of Cantalup, where it was first cultivated around 1700 A.D. It belongs to the same family as the cucumber, squash, pumpkin and gourd, and like many of its relatives, grows on the ground on a trailing vine. Cantaloupe are also referred to as a netted melon because it has a ribless rind with a distinctive netted skin. Inside of the melon there is a hollow cavity that contains seeds encased in a web of netting. Cantaloupe is also known as rockmelon in several parts of the world. My parents are growing them at the moment but not ready just yet will have to satisfy myself with these.

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Tabasco too hot for some

Tabasco is being used as a squirrel deterrent. By coating cables in the spicy hot sauce, it stops the fluffy darling gnawing on them. Try my favorite Chipotle Tabasco its smokey and hot, a hefty dash is great in lamb shank gravy.

Seasonal favorite


Spinach is high in iron, a super food, good for you and darn tasty. Spinach is bang in season from March to June and is delicious in salads with pasta or as a accompaniment to a main meal. Eat it now while in season and at its peak.

First line of defense

Be prepared to see more ladybirds this summer. Lady birds prevent aphedids on crops and will be used at an unprecedented level this summer due new EU regulations. I love the beautiful little things

Fishery laws set to change?

Has Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall ‘fish fight’ worked? It appears the EU fisheries commission are about to change their farcical discarding policy. Will we have a working fishery’s policy that means fisherman no longer have to waste millions of tonne’s of fish watch this space. Read full coverage of this story at the guardian

First Fair trade digestive biscuit

Yes you can now have a slightly clearer conscious when making a cheesecake base, Fairbreak wholewheat Digestives are here. Fair Trade products benefit the farmers and producers at little or no extra cost to us the consumers . Fairbreak biscuits are available from all good supermarkets.

Fergus Henderson opening St John Hotel soon…

Fergus Henderson is best know as the pioneer of nose to tail cooking movement and is to me a quintessential English eccentric of the first order. St John Hotel Fergus latest venture is on Leicester Street, just off Leicester Square. The restaurant will serve breakfast, lunch and dinner, along with elevenses and ‘Little Bun Moments’ in the afternoon. Post-supper rooms are available for those unable to make it home and the bar will only be open to hotel guests. Food is all about the experience of eating something new and this is Fergus Henderson in a nutshell. Visit the website to make reservations St John Hotel

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